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international problem city was not part of the larger part. >> may have some into that equates one of the oddities of the white paper and i think it's a very ripe area to follow-up is exactly what work the word imminent is doing. it's not clear from reading the white paper whether the word imminent is in his tent to get over domestic constitutional hurdles, whether it comes to international law or whether it is an attempt to get around domestic criminal prohibitions as an affirmative defense in criminal prohibitions or whether it flows and some other neat. it's simply there is an apparently self-imposed complain and it's not clear what legal problem it's designed to solve. some of the questions you asked would be different depending what were the word imminent is doing. i talk about this in my written statement, but it's an area with this committee pushing the administration's clarification. >> thank you and a thank you, mr. chairman. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. komar for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. this is an exceedingly tough it. we appreci
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
it is appropriate and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned africom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that ha
sends somebody out to waziristan , huge chunks living in cities as destitute refugees, and every day is like 9/11 for us. so, again, go back to the man in the village, and particularly the impact on women and children. whatever the debate about drones, remember there's a model humanitarian dimension that is missing. the impact on women and children is devastating and this has been documented in studies like the recent one by stanford and new york university. >> host: you mentioned drones and a lot of your book, your newest book, the thisle this --e and the drone, and the debate in washington. what's the view of drones in these tribal areas, afghanistan, pakistan? >> guest: again, peter, you use the word debate. there is a debate in the united states. it's just starting and it will pick up. but the debate implies two opposing points of view. the donate americaer americaer - the debate in america is one sided. i would like too hear from of yemen. somalis, who are vices to the drone strikes, what they think and how they're respond the drone. we don't hear their voices. well in this book
imaging -- rosa louise parks clutching her purse in those tense moments is not from a city bus number 2857 rolled down cleveland avenue. and we are reminded of the power of simple acts of courage. on an otherwise ordinary evening in montgomery, she did the extraordinary they simply staying put. and in the process, she helped all of us discovers something about ourselves. and about the great regenerative capacity of america. we have had the humility as a nation to recognize past mistakes and we've had the strength to confront those mistakes. but it has always required a public rosa parks to help us get there because of the changes she helped set in motion, entire generations of americans have been able to grow up in a nation where segregated buses only existing museums, were children of every race are free to fulfill their god-given potential and where the simple carpenter's daughter from tuskegee is honored as a national hero. what a story, what a legacy, what a country. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the majority leader of the united states senate, the honorable harry reid
to september 11th there were no fewer than four significant attacks against the western interests in the city. i'd like to have you put the chart up there, and leave it up during the course of this hearing, because each member of here has a copy of this, and there's certain things that happened we all know. we know that on may 22nd the red cross was hit with an rpg. they left town. we know that on june 11th, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an rpg. they left town. we know on april 10th, the united nations convoy was hit by an ied, and on june 6th the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb. and many, many other things and we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats rolled the world, also understand that the defense department plays an important supporting role to this effect. i suspect or witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indicators and warnings, thats to the united states interests in ben georgia si, and throughout the north africa, were growing, was the defense department not pla
and cities and i don't recall wisconsin but i know that for single women it is anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that is minimal, rent, heat, all those things that are absolutely necessary. so everyone says we work with a lot of organizations and we would say well we need one on one especially for, like the latino groups and we need one on one for every one really that's what everyone wants and you know that from your research as well. i think what is important is the senior centers and places where people can actually come for help have a great project on libraries and there are not that many of them i think there are 25 that they've found it. i've been to a number of them during programs with them. they are incredible so there are ways we can do this but there is no coordination reach nationally except for these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so why don't know what will happen after the sequestration. .. >> that is an issue that i wonder about. not only do people change jobs, the company is exist for sometimes shorter times and what is t
. cities are some of the rules we are refining us to come through this first year. a more than happy to talk about ways we are approaching the work in each case because they think that will bring it to life. but since many fewer practitioners, i thought some of these points might fit with some of your own findings. i would just say to you, people already asked me if i'm having fun. first off, it's an unbelievable privilege and it's starting to be fine. sir thank you very much. i'm looking forward to the conversation. >> thank you very much, ambassador and assistant secretary. avalon ask if you're having fun, but i did want to start with a general question. in selecting these four cases are your focusing 80% of your energy, is this a science or an art that you're trying to cultivate? is a systemic approach are trying to develop or are you seeing what you can have a tailoring individual each case? >> it's both. as the result of a process with people at the white house company assistant secretaries secretary for regional bureaus, making sure there is an ambassador who needs help and so,
% of the global population migrates to cities by 2050. further away from the food, where the food is grown, requiring new ways to prevent waste, and enhanced nutrition. here's another illustration, one should stick out all the statistics that are thrown at you so far. in fact, if there's one thing that i hope you will remember from my remarks this morning, it would be this. i still, it's just breathtaking just to say this. a full 30-50% of the food produced in the world rots forgoes unbeaten. -- or goes unbeaten. that to me is one of the most amazing statistics i will ever articulate. up to half of our total global output. except while waste might be the problem here in the developed world, the problem and the developing countries be getting the goods to market, as we all know. roughly 85% of the food produced never crosses international borders. and given the unequal distribution of people in arable land i just mentioned, that is a major obstacle today of feeding the world. so when it comes down to is that we need to produce more, higher quality, more nutritious food, and we need to becom
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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